Courses for Students

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    Courses for Students

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    CE Courses Series: Perspectives on Prevention:

    This CE course series increases awareness of the serious healthcare system-wide threat to patient safety posed by pressure ulcers and other skin damage. Both the factors intrinsic to the patient condition and the factors inherent to treatment in the acute care setting are presented as well as best practice in preventive intervention.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: Overview - CNE 1.3 Contact Hour(s)

    "Perspectives on Prevention: Overview" discusses threats to the patient's skin integrity that occur in each department throughout their hospital stay. The hospital would nurse rounds with the individual unit skin champions to present the risks in the ED, Perioperative, Critical Care, Pediatric and Medical-Surgical Environments, as well as the best practices interventions to drive incidence rates down. The Legal and C-Suite perspectives are also presented.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: Skin - Our Ultimate Defense - CNE 1.4 Contact Hour(s)

    As the body’s largest organ, skin is often unappreciated as the first line of defense against injury.  Many factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to the patient threaten its integrity as a protective barrier. This dramatically visual course reviews the many functions of skin in the maintenance of health and protection from harm.  This knowledge will assist the caregiver in developing strategies that protect the body’s ultimate defense mechanism.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: The Perioperative Environment - CNE 1.4 Contact Hour(s)

    Surgical patients are unconscious, paralyzed, sedated, or anesthetized, unable to move and therefore vulnerable to pressure damage. This course focuses on pressure ulcers where the damage is incurred during the perioperative period. It reviews the surgical patients at risk, most common areas for OR-related pressure damage, OR-related causes of pressure ulcer development, and interventions common to successful pressure ulcer prevention programs. AORN Recommended Practices are the basis of this course.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: The Critical Care Environment - CNE 1.7 Contact Hour(s)

    This course discusses hospital-acquired pressure ulcers that occur in the critical care environment. Risk factors for pressure ulcer development associated with the critically ill condition of patients, and those associated with treatment in the critical care environment, are reviewed. Focus is placed on challenging issues such as immobility, medical device related pressure, heel ulcers, moisture and high-risk bariatric patients.  Best practices in preventative practice are highlighted.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: The Pediatric and Neonatal Environments - CNE 1.6 Contact Hour(s)

    This course discusses threats to skin integrity in the Pediatric and Neonatal environments including hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, epidermal stripping and surgical site infections. Risk factors for skin injury and its treatment are reviewed. Challenging issues such as immobility, medical device related pressure, moisture and bariatric children are a focus.  Best practices in preventative practice for all these threats are highlighted.

     

    http://www.healthstream.com/HSAPP/CoursePreEnrollment?courseid=694e81f6-ce5a-e411-b549-005056b10e33&courseversion=3&showPreview=g7cwE7BISsM%3dPerspectives on Prevention: The Medical & Surgical Environments - CNE 1.5 Contact Hour(s)

    This course discusses threats to skin integrity in the Medical-Surgical environments including hospital- acquired pressure ulcers, skin tears and medical adhesive-related skin damage. Risk factors for skin injury and its treatment are reviewed. Challenging issues such as immobility, medical device related pressure, moisture and bariatric patients are a focus. Best practices in preventative practice for all these threats are highlighted.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: The Legal Impact - CNE 1.0 Contact Hour(s)

    Hospital-acquired Conditions (HACs) occur when a patient is harmed while being treated. A law suit based on a claim of negligence in care is the patient’s means to redress the injury. Pressure ulcers are the most litigated malpractice claim. In this course, the basics of a medical malpractice law suit against a nurse are presented with a focus on pressure ulcers as the basis of the claim. The role of the Standard of Care, preventive intervention and documentation are presented.

     

    Perspectives on Prevention: Surgical Site Infections: Target Zero! – CNE 1.3 Contact Hour(s)

    This course discusses surgical site infections including risk factors for their development that are related to the patient, the surgery and the hospital environment. Best practices in pre, intra and post-operative prevention are highlighted.

     

    Preventative Practice Program Development Series:

    Prevention is the best approach for addressing facility-acquired healthcare threats. Increased awareness and culture change are required for prevention programs to succeed. Courses in this series assist the program and clinical managers to develop strategies which lead to successful program implementation hospital-wide.

     

    Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs: Planning and Considerations - CNE 1.3 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit

    Pressure ulcers are a significant health threat. It has been estimated that 2.5 million patients in the United States develop one or more pressure ulcers and as many as 60,000 of these individuals die from the resulting complications each year. Prevention is the best approach for addressing this significant healthcare issue. In recent years, quality improvement and healthcare expenditures have focused on pressure ulcer prevention and these efforts have been very successful. In this course, participants will be provided with the information they will need to prepare to build and implement a facility-wide pressure ulcer prevention program.

     

    Pressure Ulcer Prevention Programs: Best Practices to Implement - CNE 1.2 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit

    It has been estimated that 2.5 million patients in the United States develop one or more pressure ulcers and as many as 60,000 of these individuals die from the resulting complications each year. Prevention is the best approach for addressing this significant healthcare issue. In recent years, healthcare quality improvement and financial initiatives have focused on pressure ulcer prevention and a number of prevention best practices have been identified. This continuing education activity will discuss key strategies for reducing pressure ulcer rates, best practices for preventing pressure ulcers, and recommendations for implementing and sustaining a successful pressure ulcer prevention program.

     

    Skin and Wound Teams - CNE 1.1 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit

    Patients with a wound require coordinated care delivered by many experienced professionals working together to address their healthcare needs. Team collaboration, when successful, brings together diverse professionals with unique expertise, approaches, and viewpoints. Working together helps individual team members to fill in knowledge gaps and broaden their perspectives. This activity will provide learners with the information needed to build a skin and wound team that will improve patient outcomes.

     

    Creating Effective Change: Building a Successful Quality Improvement Project - CNE 1.2 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit

    Despite numerous initiatives addressing pressure ulcers, pressure ulcers still can and do occur at many hospitals, and at rates that continues to place a burden on the patient, hospital, and healthcare system. This activity will discuss how nurses can strive to conduct, and potentially publish, quality improvement projects related to pressure ulcers in their organization. Specifically, discussion will include how to design and build quality improvement projects to address the gaps between current performance and desired performance and improve pressure ulcer prevention at your hospital. The core steps of QI, along with an IHI Model for Improvement, are highlighted, plus an interactive QI pressure ulcer activity.

     

     

    Wound Management Courses:

    Basic Management of Wounds - CNE 1.1 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit, updated 2016

    The management of wounds is complicated by not only the diversity of wounds but also the variety of wound care products now available to clinicians. In order to optimize patient outcomes and effectively influence wound treatment plans, nurses must be knowledgeable about wound etiology and current evidence-based best practices for their management. This activity will focus on the management of wounds. Specifically, the goals of wound care and basic management principles will be reviewed. Moist wound therapy dressings and goals will also be detailed.

     

    Advanced Physiology of Wound Healing - CNE 1.3 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit, updated 2016

    In recent years, researchers have made great progress in understanding the complex processes that facilitate and control normal wound healing as well as the mediators that impair proper healing in chronic wounds. In order to appropriately counsel patients, plan for future interventions, and facilitate the healing of chronic wounds, nurses must be knowledgeable about the cellular and subcellular events that occur during wound healing. This course will discuss the cellular and molecular basis of normal and abnormal wound healing. Examples of treatments based on wound healing biology that may be ordered for a patient with chronic wounds will also be discussed, including nursing interventions and patient teaching opportunities. Interactive reviews and scenarios will be used to allow learners to apply their understanding of the wound healing process to patient care.

     

    Infection and Bioburden in the Chronic Wound - CNE 1.2 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit

    The management of wounds is complicated by not only the diversity of wounds but also the variety of wound care products now available to clinicians. In order to optimize patient outcomes and effectively influence wound treatment plans, nurses must be knowledgeable about wound etiology and current evidence-based best practices for their management. This activity will focus on bioburden and infection in chronic wounds. Specifically, learners will be provided with information about the development of microbial infection and its impact on wound healing, as well as the microbiology of chronic wounds. The identification and management of bioburden and infection in chronic wounds will also be detailed.

     

    Physiology of Delayed Healing in Diabetic Patients - CNE 1.2 Contact Hour(s) - ANCC credit, updated 2017

    Diabetics are at increased risk for a number of serious and disabling complications. Among these is delayed wound healing. In recent years, researchers have made great progress in understanding the complex processes that facilitate and control normal wound healing as well as the mediators that impair proper healing in diabetic wounds. Nurses must be knowledgeable about the impact of high glucose levels on normal wound healing in order to appropriately counsel patients, plan for future interventions, and facilitate the healing of diabetic wounds. This course will discuss the etiology of diabetic wounds and compare diabetic wound healing to normal wound healing to explain why healing is delayed by diabetes. The nurse’s role in diabetic wound care will also be detailed.

     

    Pressure Ulcer Classification and Management - CNE 1 Contact Hour - ANCC credit

    Pressure ulcers are a significant health threat. It has been estimated that 2.5 million patients in the United States develop one or more pressure ulcers and as many as 60,000 of these individuals die from the resulting complications each year. Prevention is the best approach for addressing this significant healthcare issue. However, event when preventative methods are employed, pressure ulcers still can and do occur. Accurate identification and classification of pressure ulcers as well as implementation of appropriate management strategies are essential to improve patient outcomes and decrease the financial, physical, and emotional costs of pressure ulcers. This course will focus on pressure ulcer classification/staging and best practices for pressure ulcer management.

     

    Skin Tear Management and Prevention - CNE 1 Contact Hour - ANCC credit

    Skin tears are a frequent injury among hospitalized patients over age 65. Skin tears are of concern because these traumatic injuries can become chronic wounds if left untreated or managed inappropriately. Accurate identification and classification of skin tears as well as implementation of appropriate management strategies are essential to improve patient outcomes and decrease the costs associated with skin tears. This activity will provide learners with information they need to accurately classify skin tears and implement best practice strategies for their management. Strategies for skin tear prevention will also be discussed.

     

    Differentiating Moisture-Associated Skin Damage and Pressure Ulcers - CNE 1 Contact Hour - ANCC credit

    Pressure ulcers are a significant health threat. It has been estimated that 2.5 million patients in the United States develop one or more pressure ulcers and as many as 60,000 of these individuals die from the resulting complications each year. Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) also negatively impacts skin integrity and function and is often misdiagnosed as pressure-related damage. In order to properly care for patients and initiate appropriate interventions, nurses must be able to differentiate IAD from pressure ulcers. This activity will provide learners with the knowledge they need to successfully and accurately identify IAD and pressure ulcers. Specifically, this activity will focus on normal skin anatomy, the impact of moisture and pressure on skin integrity, and the characteristics of IAD and pressure ulcers. Interactive reviews and scenarios will be used to allow learners to apply their understanding of IAD and pressure ulcer identification to patient care.

     

    Venous, Lymphedema and Arterial Ulcers: The Challenge of Pain and Chronicity - CNE 1.2 Contact Hour(s) – NEW

    Venous, Lymphedema and Arterial wounds are prevalent and require accurate assessment, differential diagnosis and careful medical and surgical management. The pain, restricted activity, frequent need for healthcare interaction and high cost of treatment have tremendous impact on the patient for life. Inaccurate assessment can lead to poor wound management and wound chronicity. Moist wound healing is the mainstay of topical treatment. Advanced dressing technologies manage moisture levels and reduce dressing change, frequency, and pain. Adjunctive therapies, recommended if wound healing does not reach 50% reduction within 4 weeks, are introduced.

     

    Right Dressing / Right Wound: Dressing Selection for Optimal Healing - CNE 1.0 Contact Hour(s) – NEW

    This course introduces the bedside clinician to modern guiding principles of wound dressing selection, complications that can arise when the wrong dressing is chosen and the potential cost of those complications. Key decisions in dressing selection based on the presenting characteristics of the wound and peri-wound area are introduced. Since there are many types of wounds with varying characteristics and many categories of dressings that can meet the needs of the same wound, the characteristics of the different dressing categories are reviewed and compared. A few of the basic categories of advanced therapies for wounds with delayed healing are introduced.

     

    Note to HealthStream customers: If you see the message below when you try to enroll in a course, call 1-800-521-0574, selection #3 to request the course be published to your organization.

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